I met Bob Cook a few years ago. He writes articles for Forbes among other things.  He interviewed me for an article about social media.

His newest article is a great one, and lays out the number one reason why even the high school best coaches are considered “expendable” in this day and age: parents!

Heck, this whole mentality is even beginning to rear its ugly head at the college level, which is just mind boggling to me.  But earlier this year I was contacted by a college basketball coach who needed a new resume created, which is a part of what I do with my consulting business.  He went on to explain to me that he lost his NCAA Division 2 basketball job due to parent complaints to the school president. I was surprised.  I wasn’t surprised.  Baffling to me how a college president allows parents to complain to him about the tactics and philosophies of a coach while passing right by the Athletic Director!

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How Adults Have Hijacked Youth Sports

4 Things Parents Want From The Coach

5 Things That Happen When Parents Get Too Involved

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This line from Bob’s latest article says it all: In this environment, parents hold the power, because administrators now have to think of satisfying them, basically, as customers, trying to keep them happy and their kids in the school district, as well as on the district’s side for the next time it comes with a ballot request to raise taxes to fund its needs.

Go read Bob’s story about coaches getting fired.

 

Chris Fore is a Special Education Teacher in Southern California.  He is also the Special Teams Coordinator at Victor Valley College.  He coached high school football in Southern California for 16 years, including 8 as a Head Coach.  Fore has published 28 Kick and Punt Returns and Blocks, as well as the Shield Punt Manual.  He is a speaker with the Glazier Clinics, and a Coaches Choice author.  Fore runs Eight Laces Consulting, and also teaches in the Masters of Physical Education program at Azusa Pacific University.

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